Nurse

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Just a reminder that all new students who register in the fall must have a copy of their certified birth certificate (not hospital copy) and a current immunization record. Immunization requirements for elementary students include: 5 doses of Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP), 2 doses of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR), 4 doses of Polio, 3 doses of Hepatitis B, 2 doses of Varicella (Chickenpox), and 2 doses of Hepatitis A.
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NEW PLYMOUTH SCHOOL DISTRICT #372
MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION POLICY

NON-PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS:

Non-prescription medications that need to be taken during school hours must be in the original container, and must be accompanied by a note from the parent/guardian that includes the name of the medication, dose, time to be given, and the signature of the parent/guardian.

PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS:

Prescription medications will only be given to students at school under the following conditions:

1. Medication is required during school hours,
2. The medication is brought to the school in the prescription bottle (container dispensed by the doctor’s office or pharmacy)
3. It is accompanied by a signed authorization from a health care provider authorized to prescribe medications, indicating: name of medication dose to be given time to be given
4. We have written or verbal authorization from the parent to give the medication.
5. For students to be able to carry their inhaler or epi-pen with them at school, the doctor’s note must state that the student may carry the inhaler or epi-pen.
* See New Plymouth School District Policy JHCCB for explanation of medication policy.

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The importance of a good night's sleep... Getting enough sleep is often difficult to do. How much sleep is necessary for good mental and physical health? According to the Mayo Clinic, infants need around 16 hours of sleep per day, preschoolers need 11 hours per night, school-age children need 10 to 12 hours of sleep per night, and teenagers need around 9 hours per night. Lack of sleep can cause irritability and difficulties in concentration. Getting enough sleep boosts the immune system and helps the nervous system work properly. A relaxing bedtime routine, such as reading a favorite story together, can help kids unwind before lights out. Also having a consistent bedtime on school nights is beneficial.
For more information on the importance of sleep visit: http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/sleep/sleep.html#cat167
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Head Lice
Elementary-wide Lice Check - Regular lice checks help keep the number of cases in our school to a minimum. For pictures and information about lice, visit http://dermatology.about.com/cs/headlice/a/headlice.htm
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Exercise
Take advantage of the beautiful fall weather! The American Academy of Pediatrics stresses the importance of children getting at least 1 hour of physical activity each day. You may want to break up the hour into three 20-minute sessions, and try a different activity each time. Also, limit screen time to 2 hours or less each day. Screen time includes watching TV, being on the computer, playing video games, and using portable devices like iPods and cell phones.
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Dental Advice
Avoid Dental Emergencies: There are a number of simple precautions you can take to avoid accident and injury to your teeth. One way to reduce the chances of damage to your teeth, lips, cheek, and tongue is to wear a mouth guard when participating in sports or recreational activities that may pose a risk. Avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels, and hard candy, all of which can crack a tooth. Cut tape using scissors rather than your teeth. For more information, visit http://www.ada.org/370.aspx
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Medication Procedures
This is a reminder about our medication policy. If your child needs to take an over-the-counter medication (even cough drops) during school hours, please send the medication in the original container with a note signed by you indicating the dose and time to be given. Check the expiration date on the medication because I cannot give expired medicines. If your child needs to take a prescription medication during school hours, the medication must be in the original prescription bottle with a note signed by the doctor and you. If necessary, the doctor's note can be faxed to us at 208-278-3257. If you have any questions, please call me at 278-5333.
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Dear Parents,
To reduce the spread of illness, please keep your child home if they are running a fever of 99.6 or greater and/or have been vomiting and/or had diarrhea. Students may return to school when they have been fever free for 24 hours and no longer have vomiting and/or diarrhea.
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Should healthy kids get the seasonal flu vaccine?

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends a yearly flu vaccine for all children ages 6 months to 18 years. Ideally it should be given in September or as soon as the vaccine in available.
The seasonal flu vaccine is available in two forms:

A shot
-flu shots can be given to children age 6 months and older. Possible side effects may include soreness, redness or swelling at the injection site, low grade fever, and muscle aches.

A nasal spray
-the nasal spray flu vaccine can be given to children age 2 years and older. Side effects of the nasal spray vaccine for kids may include runny nose, wheezing and headaches.
Consult your child’s doctor if you have questions about flu shots for kids or wonder which type of flu vaccine would be best for your child. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.com/

How Can You Tell If You Have The Flu?
(Link to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web site)
You may have the flu if you have some or all of these symptoms:
• fever *
• cough
• sore throat
• runny or stuffy nose
• body aches
• headache
• chills
• fatigue
• sometimes diarrhea and vomiting
*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

However, some people are more likely to get flu complications and they should talk to a health care provider about whether they need to be examined if they get flu symptoms this season. They are:
• Children younger than 5, but especially children younger than 2 years old
• People 65 and older
• Pregnant women
• People who have:
◦ Cancer
◦ Blood disorders (including sickle cell disease)
◦ Chronic lung disease [including asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)]
◦ Diabetes
◦ Heart disease
◦ Kidney disorders
◦ Liver disorders
◦ Neurological disorders (including nervous system, brain or spinal cord)
◦ Neuromuscular disorders (including muscular dystrophy and multiple sclerosis)
◦ Weakened immune systems
Also, it’s possible for healthy people to develop severe illness from the flu so anyone concerned about their illness should consult a health care provider.

How long should I stay home if I’m sick?
CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other things you have to do and no one else can do for you. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine, such as Tylenol®.) You should stay home from work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings.
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Reye's Syndrome

•Be informed about Reye's Syndrome. It usually appears after a flu-like illness, upper respiratory infection, chicken pox, etc. It has been reported in children and adults.
•Early signs include continuous vomiting, listlessness, loss of pep, aggressiveness, confusion, and irrational behavior.
•Studies have shown that using aspirin or aspirin-containing medications to treat the symptoms of viral illnesses increases the chance of developing Reye's Syndrome.
•Avoid giving children medications that contain aspirin or salicylates.
For more information about Reye's Syndrome, visit http://www.reyessyndrome.org/treat.html
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Hydration
Please send your child to school each day, with a water bottle labeled with his or her name. This will ensure that each student gets enough water and will cut down on the spread of germs. Water is important for good health. Water makes up approximately 60% of our body weight. Every system in our body depends on water and even mild dehydration can cause lack of energy and tiredness. It is important for students to take their water bottle home each night to wash it out with hot soapy water. Bacteria can build up in water bottles and cause illness.
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Bicycle Safety

Wearing a bike helmet reduces the risk of brain injury by 88% and reduces the risk of injury to the face by 65%. Wearing a helmet every time you and your children ride a bicycle is one important prevention method. If children don't want to wear a helmet, find out why. Some children don't like to wear helmets because they fear they will be teased by peers for being "geeky" or because they think helmets are unattractive, uncomfortable, or hot. Talk about these concerns with children and choose a helmet they will want to wear.

Follow the rules of the road:
• ride on the right side of the road - with the traffic flow, not against it;
• obey traffic signs and signals, just as if you were driving a car;
• use correct hand signals;
• stop at all intersections and crosswalks, both marked and unmarked;
• stop and look both ways before entering a street;
• yield the right-of-way to pedestrians and skaters;
• have children ride on sidewalks and paths until they are at least ten years old, are able to show good riding skills, and are able to observe the basic rules of the road;
• if riding at dawn, at dusk, or at night, wear reflective clothing (not just light-colored clothing) and make sure that the bike has a headlight and a rear reflector.
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Is Your Home Poison Safe?

The kitchen, bathroom, and garage/storage areas are the most common sites of accidental poisonings. Each week in the bulletin, a different household area will be featured. Read the following checklist to determine if your house is safe:

Garage/Storage Area:
Ingesting charcoal lighter fluid, paint thinner and remover, antifreeze, and turpentine can be fatal. Do these poisons have child-resistant caps? Are they stored in the original labeled container? Have you made sure that no poisons are stored in drinking glasses or pop bottles? Are these harmful products locked up and out of sight and reach? Remember, keep the poison control helpline number prominently displayed near your phone: 1-800-222-1222

Kitchen:
Do all harmful products in the cabinets have child-resistant caps? Products like furniture polish, drain cleaner, and oven cleaners should have safety packaging to keep small children from accidentally opening the containers. Are all potentially harmful products in their original containers? Labels often contain first aid information for accidental poisoning. Are harmful products stored away from food? Have all potentially harmful products been placed up high out of reach of children?

Bathroom:
Medicines can poison if used improperly. Do all medications have child-resistant caps? Have you discarded out-of-date prescriptions and over-the-counter medications DO NOT FLUSH MEDICATIONS down the sink or toilet. Keep the medicine in the child-resistant bottle, black out or remove patient's name on the prescription bottles, wrap tightly in newspaper and duct tape. Place in garbage container on the day of collection or take to the landfill directly. Are all medicines in their original containers with the original labels? Are your vitamins or vitamin/mineral supplements in child-resistant packaging? An overdose of these can be fatal.
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Breakfast Boosts Brain Power

According to the National Dairy Council, studies from around the United States have shown:

1. Kids who eat breakfast seem to have an easier time learning than kids who don't eat breakfast. Breakfast eaters are able to concentrate on learning, make fewer errors, score higher on tests, are more creative, and work faster.
2. Kids who eat breakfast are more likely to be in school than non-breakfast eaters. Breakfast eaters are less likely to be absent, late, or sitting in the school nurse's office with a stomach ache or headache.
3. Kids who eat breakfast behave better in school than hungry kids. Breakfast eaters cause fewer fights, are more cooperative are less likely to be sent to the principal's office for a discipline problem, and get along better with classmates.

For some great breakfast recipes, visit www.NutritionExplorations.org or www.3ADay.org.

Fruits and Vegetables
We've all heard the phrase "eat your fruits and vegetables." Research has proven that this is good advice--here's why:

* Healthy diets rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.
* Fruits and vegetables provide essential vitamins and minerals, fiber, and other substances that are important for good health.
* Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories and are filling.

Here are some tips to help kids eat the fruits and vegetables they need:

* Substitute fruit for fries when ordering a kids meal.
* Have your kids help make a batch of trail mix at home using nuts, seeds, and dried fruit. Store trail mix in small bags so they are ready to go at a moments notice.
* Ants on a log make a great snack--spread peanut butter on a piece of celery and add raisin.

For more information visit: www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov
What is a Serving of Fruits and Vegetables? Making It Simple: The Half-Your-Plate Concept
What does a serving of broccoli look like? How many baby carrots are in a cup? Even the most well-versed nutrition professionals don’t have all these measurements memorized! 

To make it easier: fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at each meal or eating occasion. Making fruits and vegetables the focal point of every meal will help you meet your recommended amounts each day—and you won’t have to do the math!
So Keep It Simple: Fill half your plate with colorful fruits and vegetables at every meal!
For more information visit: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/?page_id=58
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A good night's sleep
With the hustle and bustle of the approaching holidays, getting enough sleep is often difficult to do. How much sleep is necessary for good mental and physical health? According to the Mayo Clinic, infants need around 16 hours of sleep per day, preschoolers need 11 hours per night, school-age children need 10 hours per night, and teenagers need around 9 hours per night. Seven to eight hours of sleep per night is usually enough for most adults. Research has shown that adults who get an average of seven hours of sleep per night have a lower mortality rate than those who get less than seven hours per night. Getting enough sleep boosts the immune system and helps the nervous system work properly. This Christmas season - to stay healthy and happy - add SLEEP to your "to do list."
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Daily Walks
A daily family walk is a great way to get everyone in the family moving. Some families take a walk after dinner, while others prefer morning walks on the weekends. Either way, walking and talking is a great way to spend family time together and enjoy the wonderful fall weather.
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Be Sun Smart
Sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for all skin cancers, including melanoma. Melanoma can be treated if caught early.
Here are the ABCDE's of Melanoma Detection:
A = Asymmetry. One half is unlike the other half
B = Border. An irregular, scalloped, or poorly defined border.
C = Color. Color is varied from one area to another; has shades of tan, brown, or black; is sometimes white, red, or blue.
D = Diameter. Melanomas usually are greater than 6mm (the size of a pencil eraser) when diagnosed, but they can be smaller.
E = Evolving. A mole or skin lesion that looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape, or color.
For more information visit http://www.aad.org/public/exams/abcde.html

* Remember to apply water resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 50. Re-apply every two hours and after swimming or sweating.
* Wear protective clothing such as long-sleeved shirts, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, when possible.
* If possible, stay in the shade between 10:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. when the sun's rays are the strongest.
* Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand as they reflect the damaging rays of the sun which can increase your chance of sunburn.
* Check your skin regularly for moles or spots that change, grow, or bleed. If you notice any changes, see your dermatologist. Skin cancer is very treatable when caught early.
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Safety Hints
Wearing a bike helmet reduces the risk of brain injury by 88% and reduces the risk of injury to the face by 65%. Wearing a helmet every time you and your children ride a bicycle is one important prevention method. If children don’t want to wear a helmet, find out why. Some children don’t like to wear helmets because they fear they will be teased by peers for being “geeky” or because they think helmets are unattractive, uncomfortable, or hot. Talk about these concerns with children and choose a helmet they will want to wear.
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Dental Health Month
February is Dental Health Month. For a healthy smile, please encourage your family to:

*Brush with a fluoride toothpaste twice each day.
*Floss once a day to clean between the teeth.
*Visit your dentist every 6 to 12 months.
*Limit between meal snacks - especially snacks high in sugar.
*Wear a mouth guard when playing contact sports.

How does fluoride help prevent tooth decay? Fluoride prevents tooth decay by slowing the breakdown of enamel and speeding up the remineralization process. The new enamel crystals that form are harder, larger, and more resistant to acid - making the tooth stronger.

Common sources of fluoride include: fluoridated drinking water, toothpaste, and mouth rinse. The New Plymouth School District, in cooperation with Southwest District Health Department, is pleased to be able to provide fluoride mouth rinse for elementary students on a weekly basis.

Strong bones and teeth for kids: Kids need three servings of low-fat dairy foods each day. 1 cup milk, 1 cup yogurt, and 1 1/2 to 2 ounces of cheese are each considered a serving of dairy and have the same amount of calcium. Milk contains 9 essential nutrients, including calcium, potassium, phosphorus, protein, vitamins A, D, and B12, riboflavin and niacin. Menu ideas for getting more calcium include chocolate pudding made with milk, chili with grated cheese, and string cheese or yogurt for a snack. For more ideas, visit www.3aday.org
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All new students who register in the fall must have a copy of their certified birth certificate (not hospital copy) and a current immunization record. Immunization requirements for elementary students include: 5 doses of Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTaP, DTP, DT, Td, TDaP), 3 doses of polio (IPV or OPV), 2 doses of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), and 3 doses of Hepatitis B.

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